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On the Road with Scott Douglas - Running for Fame 2000: The Rules

Current Contents Sport: 11-12/2000

Artikel:On the Road with Scott Douglas - Running for Fame 2000: The Rules
Erschienen in Zeitschrift:Marathon & Beyond
Standort:in der ZBSport ...
Heftnummer:4/6
Erscheinungsjahr:11-12/2000
Zeitschrift urlhttp://www.marathonandbeyond.com/contents.htm
Zusammenfassung: What's that? You're not yet famous in the running world? Don't despair: you can still claim your allotted 15 minutes if you learn to play by the rules. What will you become famous for? That doesn't really matter. Runner, guru, training expert, author . . . take your pick. (The ideal, of course, is to become famous for being famous, sort of the John F. Kennedy, Jr., of running.) We'll leave it to you to pick a niche and decide how you'll occupy it. What matters far more is that you learn how to conduct yourself so that, once famous, you stay that way. Think of your pursuit as riding a bobsled. Inertia is a powerful foe, so initially, you'll have to work quite hard. Once you attain some momentum, however, the ride will take care of itself, in part because you'll find friends on board to lean on. Things will go astray only if you refuse to go with the flow and seek other than the well-greased rut. Famous baseball figures have it easy. As Nuke LaLoosh learned in Bull Durham, he could handle pretty much any matter with one of three statements: * We gotta play 'em one day at a time. * I'm just happy to be here. Hope I can help the ballclub. * I just want to give it my best shot, and the good Lord willing, things will work out. Running is a simpler activity than playing baseball, the flip side of which is that its rules for the renowned are greater, subtler, and, in some cases, contradictory. It's not expected that you'll master all of the following prescriptions. Indeed, for most people, attempting to do so is downright dangerous, calling as they do for mental acrobatics worthy of St. Ignatius of Loyola, who convinced himself that the white he saw was black if the pope decreed it so. Reaching this state of samadhi is best left for the biggest of cheeses, such as heads of national organizations. Initially, you should focus on internalizing a few of the rules, then add others as your needs expand and your spine shrinks. To be famous in running today, it helps to think and say the following: Assume that bigger is always better. More, more, more. More ratings, more media coverage, more people in more races all the time. The more popular something is, the more merit it has. Is this not self-evident? Is questioning this not unAmerican? For example, celebrate races that reach their several-thousand-runner limit months before the event as unambiguous evidence of the health of the sport. When you're asked how many of the entrants never made it to the start line because they didn't know what they were getting themselves into, brush the question aside by predicting that next year's race will fill even sooner, and ain't that swell! You'll want to avoid mentioning golf when highlighting the unsullied worth of any and all media attention. Avoid pointing out that, while Tiger Woods will soon replace Teddy Roosevelt on Mount Rushmore and the sport enjoys ever-increasing TV coverage, its participation numbers are stagnant over the last decade. Remember that the sport to mention in all how-running-can-turn-itself-around analogies is men's professional basketball.
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